Eli Clifton: America is just one poorly-regulated fraternity.

Clifton tracked $42 million that was used to fund the Islamophobia industry.

Clifton tracked $42 million that was used to fund the Islamophobia industry.

The Center for American Progress came out with a report in 2011 that did some important Islamophobia-related math: the Islamophobia industry — an American industry built on the fear of almost one-sixth of the world’s population — is a $40 million industry. $40 million.

Reporter Eli Clifton did some of the math for the report. I spoke to him in January. We talked about the funds, the players and the consequences.

We talked about the oft-mentioned “clash of civilizations” viewpoint on Islam and the West:

I understand where folks like Peter King come from, and it’s from a view of Islam and the West as two things at war. It’s a dangerous narrative because it’s al-Qaeda’s narrative; that is the narrative of the terrorists – that Islam and the West are inherently in conflict, that of course they’re at war. I mean, you’re quite literally letting the terrorists win if that’s the type of rhetoric and perspective on Muslims that you’re adopting. 

We talked about America’s hazing process:

As a country, we’re probably getting better at identifying when we’re suggesting that a certain group doesn’t fit in the United States. Jews, Catholics, the Irish, the Italians, Japanese Americans have all faced similar types of charges. The story hasn’t changed that much. It’s a pretty consistent set of charges that are laid against “the other.” And I think we’re getting better at identifying it. That’s a narrative right there — to talk about how this is largely an immigrant community, how this fits into an American narrative. And it’s a good story, I think. America is just one poorly-regulated fraternity.

We talked about what makes him angry about American counterterrorism efforts:

My view is that counterterrorism is best accomplished by treating it as a criminal problem. You shouldn’t glorify terrorists and you glorify them when you buy into the narrative that they are involved in a war, a cultural or religious war. You should treat them as common criminals. You try to set off a bomb, we’re going to treat you as a criminal. We’re not going to give you the glory of being some sort of a war hero. I found that very troubling. That’s a very lousy way of going about counterterrorism training, to suggest that we’re involved in this centuries-old conflict. No. Your job is to stop terrorism in all forms. If the terrorists happen to be Muslim. The problem is that they’re terrorists; it’s not that they’re Muslim. You’re giving them their narrative, and you shouldn’t be.

Check out my interviews with Haroon MoghulHussein Rashid and Hind Makki. Learn more about my project.

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I’m a Jewish, Israeli-American, middle-class woman…and I am a Muslim, too.

Today, I am Muslim, too.

Today, I am Muslim, too.

There were a lot of Jewish Muslims in Times Square on March 6, 2011. There were also a lot of Christian Muslims, Buddhist Muslims, Hindu Muslims, even a few atheist Muslim, armed with nothing but colorful umbrellas and cameras.

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